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Emerging Grapes of Chile

Emerging Grapes of Chile

The wines of Chile continue to improve and continue to offer great value for money across all price points. I have to confess that Mary and I have been guilty of not looking beyond the mainstream grapes. That said, Mary and I have found this cracking pair from Viña Luis Felipe Edwards which we believe offers a refreshing change sourced from fruit in the Central Valley.

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Set Descending Direction
    • Origin
    • Chile
    Soft, pale straw in colour this wine has an intensely floral nose with hints of ripe peach. Full and rounded on the palate ending with a long honey li... Read More
    As part of a MIX6 £7.02 What is MIX6?

    Add 6 or more bottles of selected wine to your basket to receive the wholesale price.

    £5.85 exc VAT
    Single 75cl bottle
    £7.25 £6.04
    Wish List
    • Origin
    • Chile
    A wonderful ruby red colour with aromas of plums and cherries with subtle hints of spice, chocolate and coffee. Soft and well rounded on the palate wi... Read More
    As part of a MIX6 £6.96 What is MIX6?

    Add 6 or more bottles of selected wine to your basket to receive the wholesale price.

    £5.80 exc VAT
    Single 75cl bottle
    £7.25 £6.04
    Wish List
Set Descending Direction

You may remember in previous months that I have written about lost grapes; Carmenere is one of them. Once only planted in Bordeaux, this grape was lost when the vineyards were destroyed by the phyloxera in the 1850s. Somehow the grape has made its way across to South America and only in the past 20 years or so was it rediscovered in Chile. Carmenere is a close relation to Merlot yet has a riper, more profound nose and tends to make wines slightly more richer.

To accompany the Carmenere in this shipment we have selected a Viognier. This is a grape that has started to come back into fashion. Indeed with the march in its popularity, I would not be surprised if in the next decade it will replace Pinot Grigio and Sauvignon Blanc in the league tables of wine consumption. As a grape, it is popular with wine makers as it with can withstand drought. Its deep, yellow skin produces amazing coloured wines and has a distinctive character of apricots, peaches and blossom.

So, market research time if thats OK?! I would be delight to find out what you think of this new pair that we have added to our range.

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