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Go Brasil!

With the success of Chilean and Argentinian wines over the past ten years, it should be no surprise that attention is beginning to be paid to the other wine producing countries of South America. I'd been particularly keen to add some Brazilian wines to the Weavers portfolio and was delighted when I stumbled across the Fausto wines. They are produced by Pizzato Vinhas E Vinhos, a family run winery headed up by Plinio Pizzato, who is decended from Italian immigrants that passed down their wine-making skills through the generations. 

With the success of Chilean and Argentinian wines over the past ten years, it should be no surprise that attention is beginning to be paid to the other wine producing countries of South America. I'd been particularly keen to add some Brazilian wines to the Weavers portfolio and was delighted when I stumbled across the Fausto wines. They are produced by Pizzato Vinhas E Vinhos, a family run winery headed up by... read more.

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Pinio moved the winery to the current site in the sixties, cultivating grapes and producing wine that he could sell to the larger producers. Deciding to go it alone in the late nineties and produce his own labels, the Pizzato name has grown in prominence and now they have a range of wines from different vineyards that make up a seriously impressive portfolio.

Dr Fausto

I have to admit that I would have taken on every single wine that I sampled if quality was the only consideration, but bearing in mind that I needed to introduce Nottingham to Brazilian wines gradually, I thought the Dr Fausto range represented unique expression with popular appeal. Made by brothers Ivo and Flavio Pizzato, the ethos of this vineyard site is to produce wines that will suit international tastes whilst paying homage to the natural terroir. You will be familiar with the grape varieties used, but I think you'll find that there is an individual character which sets them apart.  

Brazilian Wine

Large proportions of Brazil do not have a suitable climate for viticulture due to the high levels of heat and humidity. This may explain the failure of some of the early European colonists at setting up consistent wine production during the 16th and 17th Centuries. It was during the 19th Century that many of the sites now recognised came into being but in all honesty it is huge investment as recently as the 1970s, that is behind the quality now being produced here. Most of the vineyards are situated in the cooler South, and much like Argentina and Chile it is critical that the sites have cooler micro-climates, meaning most of the vineyards are at a higher altitude. 

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