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The Grapes of Mendoza

The Grapes of Mendoza

In 1939 a young ‘Don Lolo Falasco’ started selling wines from the front of his bike, but he had ambition, a dream and a work ethic. Lolo’s legacy is now in the hands of the third and fourth generation and today ‘Bodega Los Haroldos’ is one of Argentina’s leading family-owned wineries. They are making fine wines from premium vineyard sites in Mendoza, where they utilise high altitude to impart character and freshness in their wines.

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    • Origin
    • Argentina
    Ripe red fruits, smoke and chocolate all show on the forward and intense nose. The palate has elegant tannins and subtle acidity that all underpin the... Read More
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    • Origin
    • Argentina
    A grape variety, that could be considered obscure, is going from strength to strength and becoming very popular because it offers something a little b... Read More
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Malbec and Torrontés, The Grapes of Mendoza

The two most commercially important wines of the Mendoza region of Argentina are made from the Malbec and Torrontes varieties and tend to be unblended single varietal wines.

Of the most commercial importance is Malbec which actually originated as a Bordeaux variety and has found some degree of prominence in the Cahors region in the south west of France. Whilst it is often used as a blending component in France it has come to the fore internationally through the full bodied yet easy drinking wines being made in the foothills of the Andes.

The Torrontés grape variety was until recently thought to be the same as the similarly aromatic Albillo Mayer grape which is grown in moderate quantities in Spain. DNA testing has however shown that there is no link between the two varieties and that the torrontés grown n Argentina is most likely indigenous to the country. A skillful winemaker can use Torrontés to craft wines for early drinking that are not too heavy, are high in acidity, and are intriguingly aromatic in a way reminiscent of but not identical to Muscat.

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